In Partnership with the Southern Weekend

Lohe I Ka Leo project provides access to archives of Hawaiian culture

The Kalihi-Pālama Culture & Arts Society has presented the Queen Liliʻuokalani Keiki Hula Competition for 45 years, but the nonprofit doesn't just support keiki hula.

Sponsored by Kamehameha Schools

The mission of Lohe I Ka Leo: Hear the Voice is to digitize Kalihi-Pālama Culture & Arts Society’s entire media collection with the purpose of making the archive accessible on a global level.

An essential and little-known treasure within Kalihi-Pālama’s archives are the 262 magnetic audio cassettes which include the original voice recordings of over 133 Kumu Hula featured in their two-volume publication Nānā I Na Loea Hula: Look to the Hula Resources (1984 & 1997). These recordings relate first-person hula lineage and history dating back to the monarchy era. Other audio recordings relate to workshops taught by kumu hula on the art of Hawaiian chant, mele composition, and other topics taught by many kumu who have already died.

These voices supplement Kalihi-Pālama’s print media which include photographs, handwritten notes on hula lineage, newspaper clippings, floppy discs as well as magnetic video media, all of which need to be preserved. Lohe I Ka Leo: Hear the Voice aims to preserve and publish them digitally for all who wish to research and explore Hawaiian culture from authentic Hawaiian knowledge keepers.

For more information: keikihula.org